Press Releases

Press Releases

Could Acellular Human Reticular Dermis Be Beneficial For Chronic DFUs?

MTF Announces Winners of Nicholas Miller Award for excellence in Donor Family Support

MTF eyeing expansion in Mid-Valley

MTF buys Jessup facility for $2.6 million

Donor Mom chosen to ride on Donate Life Float in Tournament of Roses Parade

STATLINE processes its 10,000,000th donor referral

Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Announces 2015 Research Grant Recipients

MTF signs group purchasing agreement with Premier, Inc.

MTF forms new wound care division to meet growing medical need

South Carolina teen chosen to promote tissue donation at Rose Parade

Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Announces 2014 Research Grant Recipients

MTF appoints Alan Milinazzo and Tracy Schmidt to Board of Directors

 

Could Acellular Human Reticular Dermis Be Beneficial For Chronic DFUs?

By Brian McCurdy, Managing Editor, Podiatry Today

An abstract submitted to the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care Spring/Wound Healing Society (SAWC Spring/WHS) notes that applying acellular human reticular dermis weekly can effectively treat non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs).

The abstract authors assessed 40 consecutive patients with non-healing ulcers between 1 and 25 cm2. If wounds did not reduce in size by 20 percent after two weeks of offloading and moist wound care, patients subsequently received either standard of care alginate wound therapy or weekly applications of wound size-specific acellular human reticular dermis.

At the end of the 12-week follow-up, the abstract authors note 16 of 20 patients healed completely with the human dermis in comparison to four of 20 patients with the standard of care dressing. The mean time to healing was 39.6 days for the human dermis cohort and 77 days for standard of care patients, according to the study abstract.

Abstract co-author Charles Zelen, DPM, notes that AlloPatch Pliable (Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation), the main treatment modality in the study, is a novel acellular dermal matrix that is aseptically processed and derived from the reticular layer of the skin, a layer that has a more consistent, open architecture than the superficial layer with key matrix proteins (collagens and elastin) similar to those in unprocessed tissue. Dr. Zelen says the reticular dermal scaffold’s extracellular elements are naturally retained through the aseptic process that contributes to favorable interactions between the cell and extracellular matrix, regulating tissue function and supporting wound healing.

“Accordingly, I feel the deeper cut of the dermis is more advantageous to wound healing when compared to the many superficial dermal grafts that are on the market,” says Dr. Zelen, who is in private practice at Foot and Ankle Associates of Southwestern Virginia.

Another advantage of AlloPatch Pliable is the availability of the graft in multiple sizes in contrast to other grafts that only offer one size. Dr. Zelen says this allows “the clinician to choose the graft size most appropriate to the wound.” The study authors add that the mean cost to closure in the human dermis group was $1,475 per healed wound and Dr. Zelen says this is a considerable cost savings in comparison to cost to closure estimates cited for advanced grafts in other studies.

Dr. Zelen suggests considering use of the dermis graft for DFUs if wound size has not reduced by 50 percent after four weeks of standard wound care.

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MTF Announces Winners of Nicholas Miller Award for excellence in Donor Family Support

Edison, NJ — The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) recently announced two winners of the 2015 Nicholas Miller Award for Excellence in Donor Family Support: Sally Jacobson of Grand Forks, ND and the Donor Family Council of the New Jersey Organ and Tissue Sharing Network (NJ Sharing Network). This is the first time both an individual and an organization have been named as winners.

“The Nicholas Miller Award honors volunteers who have promoted organ and tissue donation and provided donor family support through advocacy and education. We believe that Sally Jacobson and the Sharing Network Donor Family Council truly exemplify these qualities,” said George Herrera, Vice President, Donor Services, MTF.

The Nicholas Miller Award for Excellence in Donor Family Support is named in honor of the eldest son of Thomas and Jayne Miller. Nicholas, who died prior to his second birthday, was a heart transplant recipient. At the time of his death, Nicholas became an eye donor. Jayne Miller served as Vice President of Donor Services at MTF prior to her retirement, and she and her family are committed to increasing donor awareness education and donor family support.

Sally Jacobson, a true crusader for donation, was nominated by LifeSource , the donation agency based in Minneapolis, Minnesota which serves communities in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. Sally is both a donor family member and a liver transplant recipient. She has worked as a LifeSource Donate Life Ambassador to increase the number of people on the North Dakota state registry, providing donor families with remembrance shawls, and rallying legislative support for donation initiatives with the Governor and State Representatives. She also partnered with Trails4Transplant to organize a 311-mile horseback ride through North Dakota to raise donor awareness and funds to support transplant patients.

The NJ Organ and Tissue Sharing Network’s Donor Family Council is composed of donor families who assist the Sharing Network with its public and professional education outreach efforts. Their Sunflower Campaign is one that is treasured by hospitals. Donor family volunteers visit area hospitals and provide handwritten cards and sunflowers to the hospital staff who make donations possible. Volunteers also send cards to recent donor families, letting them know they are not alone and that there is a support network at the Sharing Network. They are also instrumental in organizing the annual NJ Sharing Network 5K Walk/Race, which, raised more than $72,000 last year.

“MTF is pleased to recognize the efforts of Sally Jacobson and the NJ Organ and Tissue Sharing Network Donor Family Council. These winners truly share the Millers’ belief in and commitment to donation and transplantation. We believe the Nicholas Miller Award helps MTF to promote excellence in Donor Family Support through recognition of best practices that encourage recovery organizations to provide consistent caring services to all donor families regardless of the type of donation,” Herrera said.

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MTF eyeing expansion in Mid-Valley

By John O’Connell – The Times Tribune, Scranton, PA

February 14, 2016 —In a laboratory clean room, where the air gets flushed 360 times an hour, technicians dressed head to foot in blue suits and white smocks carefully arrange discs of human bone on a white cloth.
Bits of bone dust mound up around steel machines where the technicians work shaping the human tissue grafts.
This isn’t science fiction. It’s a high-tech laboratory where local scientists and technicians prepare human bone and tissue called allografts for transplant patients.

The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation is the nation’s largest human tissue bank. Its sprawling lab along Mid Valley Drive in Jessup, where about 290 people work, last year prepared more than 500,000 allografts to be used for bone, cartilage, tendon and ligament replacement, and that number’s only expected to grow.
‘Good place to grow’

Based in Edison, New Jersey, the nonprofit is eyeing expansion for its Midvalley operation, looking to replicate some of its skin graft processing that happens now only in Edison, as well as other processes.

“This is a good area to work in when you have low real estate costs. We’re able to recruit really high-quality people because it’s not like there’s a glut of jobs up here,” said Executive Vice President of Donor Services Martha Anderson. “This has been a good place for us to be and to grow.”

The foundation is adding 15 to 30 new jobs in the next year and a half. It had leased its Mid Valley Drive lab but bought the property for $2.6 million in January. The foundation owns another building nearby in Olyphant where it’s planning much of the expansion with more clean rooms and laboratories.

The foundation is planning to fill a wide range of new positions, from low-skill level analysts and technicians, to highly trained engineers. Almost all positions require some science or medical background. However, all new workers get on-the-job training and some are hired with no more than a high school diploma.

As a large portion of the world’s population ages and scientists unveil new technology, bone and skin grafts become a more promising treatment option, Ms. Anderson said.

Skin grafts can help burn victims by serving as a protective bandage, regulating temperature and protecting the inner workings until new skin grows back. Skin color makes no difference as the patient’s own skin eventually replaces the grafted skin. Skin grafts also are used in breast reconstruction after a mastectomy.

Individuals with degenerating spinal discs often are good candidates for allografts. Spinal grafts, which can be made using a variety of human bones, make up the bulk of the foundation’s business in Jessup.
24-hour window

When an organ donor dies, procurement organizations work quickly to preserve the donor’s tissue within 24 hours or risk losing it. The foundation receives each bone and ligament with a full patient history. Both get scrutinized before tissue gets sent back out for a waiting transplant patient.

The foundation uses no chemicals, common practice among other tissue banks, to clean the tissue before packaging it could affect the transplant process, said operations Vice President Gary Thomas.

To be chemical-free, technicians go through rigorous, weekslong training to learn how to properly suit up and work carefully in the clean rooms.

The chemical-free method is also why 27-year-old Nikki Quick’s job is so important in the microlab. A former Riverside high school basketball star, she’s a supervisor in the microlab where each piece of tissue undergoes testing for a broad panel of possible issues.

Her team tests each worker that suits up, too, in order to make sure they aren’t carrying in organisms and regularly screens the clean rooms to detect anything that could contaminate the allografts.

Aspiring scientists entering the workforce have few options to stay local, said Michael Kiel, Ph.D., chairman of the Marywood University Science Department. The foundation and Sanofi Pasteur pharmaceuticals in Monroe County are the region’s only major laboratories, so Dr. Kiel said he welcomes news that one is growing.

“Certainly, with (the foundation) expanding, it’s going to be very good for us,” he said. “I think as more success comes out of those companies, I think other companies are going to see that this is an area where we do have educated students who can fill those jobs.”
‘Honoring the gift’

One morning last month, Ms. Quick’s team worked through dozens of round plastic containers called plates, each representing samples from technicians’ clothing, the clean room walls or equipment.

“We are in an industry where we have competitors, so we want to definitely produce the best quality of product that we can in the quickest amount of time,” Ms. Quick said.

Her boss, analytic laboratories Manager Carrie Snell, said Ms. Quick’s background, a master’s degree in biotechnology from Marywood University, propelled her from lab analyst to her supervisor’s role in about three years.

Employees work round-the-clock shifts filling the lab six, sometimes seven, days a week. The technicians and scientists realize the value of their work and how it’s improving lives, Mr. Thomas said.

“I think the most fascinating thing about it is to see the level of compassion as they process each and every donor,” he said.

Ms. Anderson agreed, and added workers have immense compassion, knowing that someone had to die for another to get a better shot at life.

“They have a huge understanding where the tissue came from and how important it is for them to honor the gift that was given,” she said.

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MTF buys Jessup facility for $2.6 million

January 14, 2016 —The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation has purchased the building it occupies in Jessup, PA for $2.6 million.

MTF had leased the property along Mid Valley Drive from a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary but opted to purchase the property, representing a commitment to the region, said Executive Vice President of Donor Services Martha Anderson.

Following the purchase, MTF, a non-profit that gather human tissue from donors and distributes it to transplant patients, could be looking to add 15 to 20 new technician and engineer positions this year and next year, Ms. Anderson said.

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Donor Mom chosen to ride on Donate Life Float in Tournament of Roses Parade

November 17, 2015 —Edison, NJ - The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) [www.mtf.org] announced today that Bethany Conkel of Dayton, Ohio, whose son, Amalya Nathaniel, (whose name means work of the Lord, given by the Lord) was a neonatal organ and tissue donor, will represent MTF on the Donate Life Float at the 2016 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA.

In March 2012, Bethany and Eric Conkel learned that their unborn son had a terminal neural tube defect called anencephaly, which results in the failure of the brain, skull, and scalp to develop. Determined to make the most of their son’s life and death, the Conkels decided to pursue organ and whole body donation. It was a difficult journey but, shortly before Bethany’s scheduled delivery date, they learned that their son could donate his liver, pancreas and whole body. You can learn more about their journey here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpx0fms5dws

Life Connection of Ohio helped to facilitate Amalya’s donation and, despite the lack of options for transplant due to his small size, his organs and tissues were placed with researchers through the International Institute for the Advancement of Medicine (IIAM)[www.iiam.org], a division of MTF. His donations went directly to medical researchers to advance studies in type 1 diabetes, train medical professionals and help improve emergency treatments for pediatric patients.

“For us, donation was able to add an extra layer of meaning to Amalya’s brief 37 weeks in utero and 80 minutes alive in our arms,” said Bethany Conkel. “Donation has truly brought us unexplainable peace, joy and healing. My husband and I have founded a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization called Purposeful Gift (www.purposefulgift.com) to help educate other families.”

“We are delighted to sponsor Bethany Conkel and to support the Donate Life Float at the Tournament of Roses Parade. The Conkel family’s story highlights the incredible gift of tissue and organ donation and the importance of the work done at IIAM and MTF," said Martha Anderson, Executive Vice-President, Donor Services.

The International Institute for the Advancement of Medicine (IIAM) works with researchers and medical education programs in the U.S. and abroad. According to Gina Dunne Smith, General Manager of IIAM, the experience with the Conkel family led IIAM to develop a neonatal donation program to support families of babies with terminal diagnoses who wish to contribute to medical advancement through organ and tissue donation. This program offers a unique service to researchers and to families whose babies will die from natural causes shortly after birth. To date IIAM has worked with over 40 families who have chosen neonatal donation and has placed 146 organs and tissues with researchers throughout the U.S.

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STATLINE processes its 10,000,000th donor referral

August 11, 2015 —Denver, Colorado - Statline, a leading provider of communications and technology systems for the donation and transplantation communities, today announced it has processed its 10,000,000 organ/tissue donor referral.

Since its inception in 1997, Statline has provided highly specialized communications and technology expertise to the donation and transplantation community. Statline facilitates donation, transplantation and research through products and services that provide a vital link between donor hospitals, procurement organizations, transplant centers and researchers.  Statline’s committed team engages with the entire donation process from donor screening, messaging, registry, donor recovery through allocation and placement.

The 10,000,000th referral was taken from a hospital in Wisconsin, working with the BloodCenter of Wisconsin/Wisconsin Donor Network, a long-time Statline partner.

Colleen McCarthy, Wisconsin Donor Network/Wisconsin Tissue Bank Vice President said, “Every referral is a tragedy for a family, but out of these tragedies come incredible acts of kindness and generosity. This referral, like all the others, carries extraordinary responsibility and respect. I am comforted to know that our partners at Statline are there right along with us to take care of our donor families and grateful transplant recipients.”

Alison Smith, Statline General Manager said, “This accomplishment is one we celebrate not because it is a number – it is what that number represents - a partnership with our organ and tissue procurement colleagues and most importantly, the generosity of donors and donor families whose willingness to give the gift of life made a difference in the lives of so many. We look forward to continuing to work with our partners to ensure that more organs and tissues are available because of our mission, like theirs, is to save and enhance lives.

Statline, located in Denver, CO, serves more than 80 procurement agencies in the US and Canada. Statline is a subsidiary of MTF, the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation which located in Edison, NJ and is one of the nation’s leading tissue banks.

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Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Announces 2015 Research Grant Recipients

April 9, 2015 —The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) announces the recipients of its 2015 Research Grants.  Since 1987 the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation has been at the forefront of tissue research, with about $40 million awarded through 2014. MTF anticipates awarding close to $2 million in grants and awards in the 2015 calendar year. The 2015 grant recipients are as follows:

PEER REVIEW – ESTABLISHED INVESTIGATOR

Clark Hung, Ph.D., Columbia University New York, Local Dexamethasone Delivery for Osteochondral Grafting, $300,000

Eric Ledet, Ph.D., Rensselaer Institute, Enhancing Interbody Allograft Loading to Facilitate Spinal Fusion, $299,329

Chia Soo, M.D., Regents of the University of California, Allograft/DBM use in Infected Bone Regeneration When Combined with Silver Nanoparticles and BMP2, $300,000

J.R. NEFF AWARD

Jie Song, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School, Resorbable Osteoinductive and Osteoconductive Artificial Periosteal Membrane for Augmenting Cortical Bone Allograft Healing, $300,000

PEER REVIEW – JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR

Beth Bragdon, Ph.D., Boston University (BUMC), Defining the Tissue Origin of DBM Responsive Skeletogenic Stem Cells, $100,000

Syam Nukavarapu, Ph.D., University of Connecticut Health Center, Rapid and Effective Revitalization of Bone Allografts at the Point of Care, $100,000

W.F. ENNEKING CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD

Phillipp Leucht, M.D., Ph.D., NYU Langone Medical Center, Embryonic Origin and Hox Status Effects Osteoprogenitor Cell Behavior During Adult Bone Repair, $300,000

OREF AWARD

Aaron James, M.D., UCLA, Combining NELL-1 and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling for Improved Bone Regeneration, $100,000

HERNDON AWARDS

Austin Ramme, M.D., Ph.D., NYU School of Medicine, Subchondral Bone Microdamage: A New Therapeutic Target for PTOA Prevention Following ACL Injury, $20,000

Debbie Yen-Dai Dang, M.D., Ph.D., UCSF, Interactions between Cadherin 11 and B-Catenin During Fracture Healing,$20,000

For more information on how you can apply for a research grant, contact Jeffrey Cartmell, Ph.D., Associate Director, Intellectual Property & Grants (732-661-2151, Jeffrey Cartmell, Ph.D.), or go to the MTF website (www.MTF.org ).

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MTF signs group purchasing agreement with Premier, Inc.

January 8, 2015 — The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) Wound Care division announced today that it has signed a group purchasing agreement with Premier, Inc., a leading healthcare improvement company. The agreement offers Premier alliance members access to MTF Wound Care’s innovative line of biologic tissue forms.

MTF Wound Care will initially offer Premier alliance members access to two tissue forms: AmnioBandTM Membrane, a human derived allograft placental matrix and AlloPatchTM Pliable, a human derived allograft dermal matrix.

“This is an exciting extension of our existing Premier partnership,” said Kim Rounds, Vice President of MTF Wound Care. “We can now bring innovative and healing wound care solutions to Premier’s patients and surgeons—many of whom already choose a broad selection of MTF tissues for their patients.”

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), treating chronic wounds is a growing concern, fueled by increasing costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in such conditions as obesity and diabetes. NIH reports that in the United States alone, more than $25 billion is spent annually to treat chronic wounds.

Given the mounting need, MTF Wound Care is dedicated to developing highly advanced, safe, clinically based and cost-effective wound care solutions that work in concert with the body’s natural healing process.

MTF Wound Care is a division of MTF, the nation’s leading tissue bank. MTF supplies specialty donated human tissue for use by surgeons in orthopedic, spine, plastic and general surgery and sports medicine procedures.  Founded by surgeons over 25 years ago, MTF maintains strict standards for donor recovery criteria and tissue processing. With over 100,000 donors recovered and over six million grafts distributed since its founding, MTF has maintained an exemplary reputation for safety and quality.

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MTF forms new wound care division to meet growing medical need

December 22, 2014 — The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) announced today the launch of MTF Wound Care—a new MTF division dedicated to researching, developing and providing allograft-based, biologic solutions to treat acute and chronic wounds.

MTF Wound care is a natural extension of MTF—the non-profit is the nation’s leading tissue bank supplying specialty donated human tissue for orthopedics, spine, plastic surgery, general surgery, sports medicine, and beyond. Founded and run by physicians, MTF maintains strict standards for donor recovery criteria and tissue processing. With over 100,000 donors recovered and over six million grafts distributed since its founding, MTF has maintained an exemplary reputation for safety and quality.

According to Kim Rounds, Vice President of MTF Wound Care, the organization will initially offer two tissue forms: AmnioBandTM Membrane, a human derived allograft placental matrix; and AlloPatchTM Pliable, a human derived allograft dermal matrix. Both will be available in January 2015. 

“These two innovative tissue forms are excellent examples of what we can bring to wound care professionals and their patients,” said Ms. Rounds. “Both AmnioBand and AlloPatch work in concert with the body’s natural healing process. They are the first of what we plan to be a broad and differentiated portfolio of offerings for wound care. Our focus, as always, is to develop solutions that are highly advanced, safe, clinically based and cost effective.”

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), treating chronic wounds is a growing concern, fueled by increasing costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in such conditions as obesity and diabetes. NIH reports that in the United States alone, more than $25 billion is spent annually to treat chronic wounds.

Diabetes is a particular concern among wound care professionals, because the condition contributes directly and most heavily to the growing wound care problem:

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are about 347 million people with
    diabetes worldwide, and that number is expected to rise considerably by 2030.

  • About 25% of people with diabetes will suffer a lower extremity ulcer over their lifetime. Since healing
    is typically slow in diabetics, there’s an increased risk of infection and a higher risk for amputation.
    In fact, diabetic ulcers precede 85% of lower extremity amputations.

“The statistics are sobering,” said MTF President and CEO Bruce Stroever. “It is at the core of MTF’s mission to do all we can to help patients in need. Through the generous gift of tissue donation, MTF can develop advanced, biologic tissue forms designed to optimally support the wound-healing process. We can make treating wounds better and more effective for everyone: patient and practitioner alike.”

To learn more about MTF Wound Care, contact Kim Rounds, Vice President, MTF Wound Care at kim_rounds@mtf.org.

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South Carolina teen chosen to promote tissue donation at Rose Parade

December 1, 2014 — The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF) announced today that Naomi Kurlowich of Columbia, SC, a tissue transplant recipient, will represent MTF for the Donate Life Float at the 2015 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA.

Diagnosed at birth with Down Syndrome, Naomi Kurlowich, never let it slow her down, from playing on a local softball team for children to being a physically active student at school.

Around her eighth birthday, Naomi began to experience painful dislocations of her kneecaps, also known as patellofemoral instability, while playing the sports she loves so much. The frequency and severity of the episodes increased as the ligaments supporting her patella became weaker with each dislocation.

A nasty fall right before her 15th birthday left her wheelchair-bound and her parents were advised that a more aggressive approach was needed. Their surgeon explained that Naomi's ligaments were too weak to reconstruct and suggested using donated tissue to fix the problem.

Naomi had the surgery to repair both of her knees a few months apart. She received tissue from two donors to strengthen and stabilize her knees. As her parents watched her recover, they marveled at the thought that two families had made the most selfless gift of donation, which gave their daughter a new lease on life.

"After a few weeks of physical therapy, Naomi progressed to a walker and the wheelchair was history," said Carol Kurlowich, Naomi's mother. "Two years later it still makes my heart sing to watch her run exuberantly around a ball field and up and down a basketball court."

Today, Naomi is an active 17-year-old who can walk, run and play softball, all from the generous gift of tissue donation from two donors and their families.

“We are delighted to sponsor Naomi and to support the Donate Life Float at the Tournament of Roses Parade. Her story highlights the incredible gift of tissue donation and the importance of the work done at MTF," said Martha Anderson, Executive Vice-President, Donor Services.

To see a video about Naomi and her story, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SXAmNJ6vng

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Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation Announces 2014 Research Grant Recipients

The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF), the world’s leading tissue bank announces the recipients of its 2014 Research Grants.  Since 1987, MTF has been at the forefront of research focused on the transplantation of donated human tissue, with approximately $38 million awarded through 2013.  MTF anticipates awarding close to $2 million in grants and awards in the 2014 calendar year.  The 2014 grant recipients approved for funding are as follows:

PEER REVIEW – ESTABLISHED INVESTIGATOR
This is a multi-year program for any researcher who has previously been funded by a foundation or a federal agency and has published in a peer-reviewed journal as a Principal investigator.

Heike Daldrup-Link, M.D., Ph.D., Stanford University, Imaging Immune Responses to Stem Cell Mediated Bone Repair, $300,000

Henry Donahue, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, Hydroxyapatite Nanotopographies to Enhance Allograft Osteointegration, $299,185

Sang Jin Lee, Ph.D., Wake Forest School of Medicine, Allogeneic Decellularized Tissue Scaffolds for Reconstruction of Volumetric Muscle Loss, $300,000

J.R. NEFF AWARD
The J.R. Neff Award is named in honor of James R Neff, M.D. who was a highly respected, innovative orthopaedic surgeon and researcher.  During much of his tenure as Chairman of Orthopaedics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, he served on MTF’s Medical Board of Trustees and Board of Directors.   

Chunfeng Zhao, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Synovialization and Revitalization of Tendon Allograft for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction, $300,000

PEER REVIEW – JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR
This is a one-year award for any Ph.D. or M.D. who is post-graduate work or residency and who has never obtained an award from a foundation or a federal agency.

Alan Getgood, M.D., Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic (London, Ontario), Techniques to Reduce Meniscus Extrusion During Meniscus Allograft Transplantation, $51,702

Karin Payne, Ph.D., University of Colorado, Revitalization of Bone Allograft with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Enhance Spinal Fusion, $100,000

CAREER DEVELOPMENT
The Career Development Award is granted to an orthopaedist interested in pursuing and developing an academic career.

Frank Petrigliano, M.D., The Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Evaluation of Structural Fibroblasts and Ligament Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament, $300,000

OREF AWARD
Since 2000, MTF has provided the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) with one $100,000 unrestricted research grant to aid an investigator in funding their orthopaedic research project.

Abhijit Dighe, Ph.D., University of Virginia, Interaction Between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and T Cells During Osteogenesis, $100,000

HERNDON AWARDS
Through the Orthopaedic Research Education Foundation, two $20,000 grants are awarded in the name of our first President, Charles H. Herndon, M.D., for orthopaedic resident research projects.

Alekos Theologis, M.D., University of California, San Francisco, The Effect of the Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Bisphenol A (BPA) on Endochrondral Ossification in Fracture Repair, $20,000

Nathan Skelly, M.D., Washington University (St. Louis) Biomechanical Analysis of Tensile Properties and Fiber Alignment in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament to Map Ligament Bundle Design, $20,000

For more information on MTF’s research grant program, contact Hans Burchardt, Ph.D., Vice-President, Scientific Affairs (570-496-3434) or Hans_Burchardt@MTF.org ), or go to the MTF website (www.MTF.org ).

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MTF appoints Alan Milinazzo and Tracy Schmidt to Board of Directors

Edison, NJ, March 2014 — Bruce Stroever, President and CEO of the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation    (MTF) today announced the appointment of Alan Milinazzo, President of InspireMD, and Tracy Schmidt, CEO of Intermountain Donor Services to the MTF Board of Directors.

“We are honored to welcome Alan Milinazzo to the MTF Board,” said William W. Tomford, MD, Chairman of the MTF Board of Directors. “With more than 25 years of executive management experience in the life sciences sector, his business acumen and experience with medical device companies will bring added depth to our board. As MTF’s business becomes increasing complex, Alan’s expertise will be of critical importance to the Board.”

Prior to his position at InspireMD, Milinazzo served as CEO of Orthofix International. He spent 12 years with Boston Scientific Corporation in a variety of executive roles, including Vice President of Marketing for SCIMED Europe. Milinazzo also worked for Medtronic Inc. serving first as Vice President of Medtronic Inc.’s vascular business, and then as Vice President and General Manager of Medtronic’s coronary and peripheral businesses. He was instrumental in the development and commercialization of a number of key products while at Medtronic, including the company’s first drug coated stent platform, Endeavor. Mr. Milinazzo is a cum laude graduate of Boston College.

“It’s a privilege to welcome Tracy Schmidt to the Board of Directors,” said Bruce Stroever, CEO of MTF. “Tracy’s experience with and understanding of the intricacies of organ and tissue donation and his commitment to excellence in service to donors, families and recipients will bring an added dimension to our Board.”

As CEO of Intermountain Donor Services, an organ procurement organization dedicated to the recovery and transplantation of organs and tissues, Tracy Schmidt helped start one of the first fully integrated donor registries in the United States for the states of Utah and Idaho. He also was instrumental in the successful passage of state legislation to support donation. Tracy has served on MTF’s Medical and Donation Boards of Trustees and has served as the Chair of MTF’s Ethics Committee. Prior to his position at Intermountain Donor Services, Tracy spent eight years as a hospital administrator for the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in Panorama City, California. Mr. Schmidt is a magna cum laude graduate of University of Utah and holds a MHA from the University of Minnesota.

“Both Alan and Tracy are proven leaders who will bring outstanding expertise and experience to the MTF Board as it continues to oversee the Foundation’s mission of providing the highest quality tissue grafts and advancing the science of transplantation,” Stroever said.

About MTF:
The Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, a non-profit organization based in Edison, NJ, is a national consortium comprised of leading organ procurement organizations, tissue recovery organizations and academic medical institutions. Since its inception in 1987, MTF has received tissue from more than 100,000 donors and distributed more than 5 million grafts for transplantation. For more information, visit www.mtf.org.

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